Thursday, December 8, 2016

A donso alone


a wonderful donso ngoni recording
with Samba Traore at the controls  from  the distant 1999
bare and essential

7 comments:

  1. Very satisfactory to see continuity in the blog, thanks!

    It is mysterious this donsongoni virtuoso, on the one hand he has no hunter repertoire, but hads wassoulou style.
    It is surprising that in Tambakunda, Samba expresses in Bambara, has Bambara style and handles wassoulo rhythms.

    The second song called Dali is none other than Dalygeleman by Sali Sidibé, in the song he mentions Oumou Sangare, in others he speaks of Segou and Bamako.
    This artist does not seem very Senegalese....

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    Replies
    1. the wassoulou link is very obvious to be ignored,
      on the other hand Tambacounda had links with Bamana from the past to the present and don't forget that some people identify themselves as Bambara over Senegalese.
      let the mystery lurk for some time
      till it is solved.(if ever)
      Blog continues as usual-forever!

      Delete
  2. I agree with Ngoni, there is not much of donsonyia in it, apart from the cover..

    In the old days, there was a link between the donso and the Ouassolou, the kamalen ngoni from the Ouassolou beeing a derivate from the donso n' goni. Today, a lot of the strong donso's societies still are in the south of Mali, or in the surrounding area in BF, Guinée, etc

    @Ngoni:
    What do intent by "This artist does not seem very Senegalese...."??
    The Tambacounda area is "Mandinkaland" (beside de Serahuli, but they' re from Mali, or even Empire of Ouagadu too...) close to Mali and Gambia..

    From Tambacounda, you have jali like Sourakata Koite, you might look at "Niani: Chants et rythmes de la communauté mandingue", too.

    A.

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  3. @A.
    It is not necessary to be Wolof to be Senegalese, but Senegal has enough energy to transform its inhabitants, a Soninké of Senegal, or a Fula of Senegal, are of Senegal, culture transforms.
    Perhaps Samba belongs to the Bambara community of Tambacounda, but culturally I can not perceive any miscegenation.

    Instead he sings a song by Sali Sidibé, or Kun fe ko performed by Oumou Sangaré or Djeneba Diakité as (Kounfeko).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you Nauma, I really enjoyed this recording.
    I hope you have a good year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you dear Janas
      all the best for you.

      Delete